Thursday, June 28, 2012

Fecal Matters: Testing the Waters Report on our Nation's Beaches Released

BEACH Program Update

Yesterday, the Natural Resource Defense Council (NRDC) released their “Testing the Waters Report” comparing Washington's BEACH Program results to other coastal states. Proudly, Washington ranks 10 out of 30 states indicating good beach water quality. This ranking is an improvement over last year's report which ranked Washington State 14 out of 30. This report is helpful because it compares state-to-state BEACH monitoring data to a common federal water quality criterion.

For more information, the report is found here: http://www.nrdc.org/water/oceans/ttw/default.asp

Visit the BEACH web site to find the latest results for these and other saltwater beaches: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/


Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv.


Julie Lowe is the BEACH Program Manager and can be reached at julie.lowe@ecy.wa.gov


Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Fecal Matters: Mukilteo Lighthouse Park in Snohomish County is Open for Swimming!

BEACH Program Update

The beach at Mukilteo Lighthouse Park located in the City of Mukilteo, Snohomish County is now open for swimming. Additional samples collected on Monday, June 25, 2012 show bacteria concentrations have dropped to background levels. A swimming advisory was previously issued for this beach on Friday, June 22, 2012.

Visit the BEACH web site to find the latest results for these and other saltwater beaches: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/

Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv.

Julie Lowe is the BEACH Program Manager and can be reached at julie.lowe@ecy.wa.gov


Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Keeping you informed on environmental impact statement process for proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal

by Katie Skipper, communication manager, Bellingham Field Office

When 800 people show up for a presentation about the environmental impact statement (EIS) process, you know the community is interested.

That’s what happened March 20, 2012, during our public meeting about the Gateway Pacific Terminal project proposed for Cherry Point, reinforcing for us and our co-lead-agency partners that we need to keep you informed about where we are in the process and how you can participate.

We heard from a number of you recently when Whatcom County finalized its contract with CH2M Hill, the environmental consulting company the agencies selected to help us prepare the EIS.

Because many of you had the same or similar questions, we thought it might be helpful if we put them together with some answers.

We’ll post these on our website, and add to it with different topics as they come up.

How can you ensure that everyone has equal access to the process, and that SSA, BNSF or environmental groups can’t unfairly influence the outcome?

The agencies are committed to conducting a fair, thorough and complete environmental review of the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal according to state and federal laws. We must follow existing rules, regulations and procedures and apply them consistently and fairly. Under these rules, everyone will have the same opportunity to provide public comment at key points in the process. Nobody will be able to unfairly influence the outcome. The contractor works for the agencies, not for the companies or any outside parties.

You’ve said the scoping period would be 30 to 60 days. Can it be longer?

Yes. The agencies must carry out the environmental impact statement (EIS) process, including scoping, consistently, according to the law, and in a way that provides meaningful participation opportunities to the public. Under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) rules, the normal length of the comment period for scoping would be 21 days (WAC 197-11-408). There is a provision for “expanded scoping” (WAC 197-11-410) that allows 30 days, but it can be extended if the applicants agrees to a longer comment period. In this case, based on public concern, the county indicated that the scoping period should be 120 days, and the applicants have agreed. Ecology is supportive of the extended period, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District Regulatory Branch does not object to the extended 120-day scoping period .

I can’t find anything about scoping meetings in the contract. Where and when will scoping meetings be held? How will you determine the time and location?

The co-lead agencies have not yet decided on the number or the location of scoping meetings. Once hired, the consultant will help organize and advertise scoping meetings, including investigating locations and venues. The information on time and location of meetings will be publicized broadly in the media and on government agency websites. There also will be opportunities to learn about the proposal and submit formal comments without attending a scoping meeting.

I would like to see existing information about the proposed project’s impacts before I prepare my scoping comments. When and where will studies and reports be available?

The scoping notice will have a description of the project and include a link to the co-lead agencies’ comprehensive website where all preliminary studies and reports that are available will be posted, as well as up-to-date information about the process, public comment periods and public meetings.

After scoping, when is the next opportunity for the public to comment?

The next public comment period will be for the draft EIS, which may take a year or more to prepare. The draft EIS will include all of the studies, reports, models, data and information gathered about the proposed project’s potential impacts identified through scoping.


What protections do you have in place to ensure that the applicant cannot influence the consultant during scoping or later phases of the EIS process?

The consultant will work directly for the co-lead agencies. Communication between the applicants and the consultant will take place only when the agencies are present, or with the permission of the co-lead agencies, and must be documented as specified by the communication protocol.

Will the applicants be able to talk to the agencies during scoping? Can I come to meetings between the applicants and the agencies to ensure the public’s interests are adequately represented?

The agencies need to communicate with and obtain information about the project from the applicants in order to prepare the draft EIS. The laws governing the review process include specific times for public input. The first opportunity for public input is scoping. After scoping, the second opportunity will be a public comment period on the draft EIS. Meetings between the applicant and the agencies are not public meetings. The process was designed to ensure that the agencies obtain the project information they need from the project applicants, while ensuring public participation at all key points in the process.

Who is paying for the consultant?

The applicants will reimburse the county for the consultant’s costs for work on the EIS through an agreement with Whatcom County. This contract includes provisions for all of Whatcom County’s direct costs, consistent with the handling of other applications.

Friday, June 22, 2012

Fecal Matters: Swimming Advisory Issued at Mukilteo Lighthouse Park, Snohomish County

BEACH Program Update

Today, the BEACH Program issued a swimming advisory at Mukilteo Lighthouse Park in Snohomish County. The swimming advisory was issued based on elevated bacteria in the marine water and a nearby stormwater outfall.

Contact with fecal contaminated waters can result in gastroenteritis, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses.

Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on Facebook, checking beach status on Coastal Atlas, or joining our listserv. Julie Lowe is the BEACH Program Manager and is available at 360-407-6543 or julie.lowe@ecy.wa.gov for questions.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Fecal Matters: The Swimming Beach Near the Fauntleroy-Southworth Ferry Terminal in Seattle is Open!


BEACH Program Update

The beach area near the Fauntleroy-Southworth ferry terminal in Seattle is now open for swimming. The Seattle-King County Public Health District opened the beach on June 7, 2012 after sample results indicate low levels of bacteria. The beach was previously closed on June 3, 2012 because of a sewage overflow at a nearby outfall.

Visit the BEACH web site to find the latest results for these and other saltwater beaches: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/

Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv.

Julie Lowe is the BEACH Program Manager and can be reached at julie.lowe@ecy.wa.gov


Monday, June 11, 2012

Enviro ed journal features Ecology’s Hanford outreach efforts

By Erika Holmes, Community Outreach & Environmental Education, Nuclear Waste Program

Late last year, the environmental education journal Clearing put out a call for articles for their annual compendium issue. With the majority of readers in, and content focused on, the Pacific Northwest, I figured it would be a great opportunity to share ways teachers can bring Hanford into their lessons.

The article covers some of the service-learning projects we’ve done with college students, and shorter classroom activities we’ve done with younger students. In addition, it has sections overviewing Hanford history, the cleanup effort, and Hanford-related classroom resources.

To read “Hands-on Hanford: Linking lessons to the world’s largest environmental cleanup” in the Clearing Compendium, skip to page 24 after opening it online.



Thursday, June 7, 2012

Fecal Matters: Beach Closure near the Fauntleroy-Southworth Ferry Terminal in Seattle

BEACH Program Update

On June 3, 2012, Seattle-King County Public Health closed the beach area around the Fauntleroy-Southworth Ferry Terminal in the Fauntleroy neighborhood in Seattle. The beach area was closed because of a sewage overflow at a nearby outfall.  The County is actively testing the water quality in Fauntleroy Cove.

Contact with fecal contaminated waters can result in gastroenteritis, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses.

Stay updated about water quality at your beaches by keeping up with us on our blog Fecal Matters, on Facebook, or join our listserv. Julie Lowe is the BEACH Program Manager and is available at 360-407-6543 or julie.lowe@ecy.wa.gov for questions.


Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Deep Sea update: Delivered to shipyard

By Larry Altose, Ecology public information

Photo Source: Global Diving & Salvage, Inc.
The former fishing vessel Deep Sea arrived June 6, 2012 in Seattle at the Stabbert Maritime dry dock for dismantling, after passing through the Chittenden Locks, as shown in the photo.

For more information on the Deep Sea incident, please see: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/incidents/FVdeepsea/index.html

Deep Sea Update: En-route to Seattle

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information


Photo source: Global Diving and Salvage, Inc.
The Deep Sea departed Penn Cove shortly after 5 a.m. today, towed by the tug Taurus. The vessels are expected to reach Seattle by approximately early afternoon.  See Ecology's Deep Sea website for more information.

The state Department of Health re-opened the shellfish harvest areas north of Mueller Park June 5 after test results showed samples taken from those areas are safe to eat. The area of Penn Cove south of Mueller Park will remain closed until additional test results shows that shellfish there also meet standards. All shellfish harvesting was closed May 15 due to the fuel leaking from the Deep Sea. Click here for more information.

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Weather permitting, Deep Sea to leave Penn Cove at 5 a.m., June 6

By Larry Altose, Ecology public information

The 140-foot fishing vessel Deep Sea, raised from the bottom of Penn Cove June 3, is ready to depart, depending on weather conditions.

Winds forecast for today could push wave heights to 4 feet, while safe towing conditions require waves under 3 feet.Tomorrow’s forecast predicts calmer conditions, and the Deep Sea’s tentative departure time is 5 a.m.The tug Taurus will move the vessel.

U.S. Coast Guard and Washington Department of Ecology officials yesterday determined that the Deep Sea presents no substantial threat of an oil spill.The Coast Guard today approved a tow plan for the vessel’s trip to Seattle.

The Taurus and Deep Sea will proceed at up to 6 knots, or about 7 mph. The Deep Sea could reach the Chittenden Locks in Seattle by early afternoon.The Taurus will deliver the Deep Sea to the Stabbert Yacht and Ship dry dock in Ballard for dismantling.

The larger of the two floating cranes that lifted the Deep Sea left Penn Cove late yesterday.The Deep Sea then moored to the smaller crane barge.

Meanwhile, environmental cleanup crews have started wrapping up efforts to remove oil from the water immediately surrounding the Deep Sea. They also began to remove some of the 5,700 feet of oil-spill containment boom and cleanup materials deployed for the lifting.The crews have conducted these operations since the vessel sank May 13 after a fire.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the Coast Guard, Ecology and Island County. Assisting in the response are the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Global Diving & Salvage Inc. (Global) and NRC-Environmental Services (NRC-ES).

Island County’s departments of Emergency Management and Public Works, and the Island County Sheriff’s Office, are providing local support to the response effort.

The unified command also receives assistance from the Washington departments of Health (WDOH) and Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and helicopter service from the King County Sheriff’s Office (KCSO).

The state Health Department closed all shellfish harvesting in Penn Cove on May 15. The closure will remain in effect until testing confirms shellfish from the area are safe to eat.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard's Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.

For more information:

Fishing Vessel Deep Sea Fire and Diesel Spill: www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/incidents/FVdeepsea/index.html

Ecology's Spills Program: www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/spills.html

Ecology’s social media: www.ecy.wa.gov/about/newmedia.html

Monday, June 4, 2012

Deep Sea refloated in Penn Cove; tow to Seattle awaits calm weather and seas

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information


Wheelhouse of the Deep Sea, afloat again in Penn Cove on June 4, 2012.  Photo: Dept. of Ecology
The fishing vessel Deep Sea, raised from the bottom of Penn Cove yesterday, floated on its own today. The 140-foot vessel underwent inspections today to determine its seaworthiness and to locate any remaining pockets of oil for removal.

The larger of the two floating cranes that lifted the Deep Sea is scheduled to depart for Seattle tonight. The Deep Sea is now moored to the smaller crane barge.

Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and U.S. Coast Guard Officials will decide when the vessel can be towed to a dry dock in Seattle for dismantling. That will occur as soon as weather and sea conditions allow. Tomorrow’s forecast predicts winds that will push wave heights to four feet. Safe towing conditions require waves under three feet.

Meanwhile, environmental cleanup crews continued efforts to remove oil from the water immediately surrounding the Deep Sea. Oil trapped in the hull when the vessel rested on its side floated to the surface when floating cranes set the Deep Sea upright before raising it, yesterday.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the Coast Guard, Ecology and Island County, Assisting in the response are the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Global Diving & Salvage Inc. (Global) and NRC-Environmental Services (NRC-ES). The county’s departments of Emergency Management and Public Works, and the Island County Sheriff’s Office, are providing local support to the response effort.

The unified command also receives assistance from the Washington departments of Health (WDOH) and Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and helicopter service from the King County Sheriff’s Office (KCSO).

The state Health Department closed all shellfish harvesting in Penn Cove on May 15. The closure will remain in effect until testing confirms shellfish from the area are safe to eat.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard's Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.

For more information: Media Contacts:
Larry Altose, Ecology, 206-920-2600, larry.altose@ecy.wa.gov

Curt Hart, Ecology, 360-480-7908, curt.hart@ecy.wa.gov

Chief Warrant Officer Iain Wells, U.S. Coast Guard, 206-910-3524

Toni Droscher, Dept. of Natural Resources, 360-902-1523, toni.droscher@dnr.wa.gov

Terry Clark, Island County Department of Emergency Management, 360-632-3902

Sunday, June 3, 2012

Sunken fishing vessel Deep Sea brought to surface in Penn Cove

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information

Deep Sea Incident website: www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/incidents/FVdeepsea/index.html

Deep Sea vessel status

Two floating cranes raised the 140-foot sunken fishing vessel Deep Sea to the surface of Penn Cove today, Sunday June 3.

The lift capped an intensive multi-agency response to protect the area’s shellfish and other resources against damage from thousands of gallons of oil on the Deep Sea when it sank at its mooring May 13 after a fire.

The Deep Sea must still undergo inspections to determine whether it can float safely or must be placed on a barge for a tow to Seattle as early as tomorrow for dismantling.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the U.S. Coast Guard, Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and Island County. Assisting in the response are the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Global Diving & Salvage Inc. (Global) and NRC-Environmental Services (NRC-ES). The county’s departments of Emergency Management and Public Works, and the Island County Sheriff’s Office, are providing local support to the response effort.

The unified command also receives assistance from the Washington departments of Health (WDOH) and Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and King County Sheriff’s Office (KCSO).

Sunday's activities

The lift operation began Sunday morning, paused briefly so divers could remove several tons of silt from the deck, and resumed by late morning. By 1:30 p.m. the deck stood above the surface, and crews began to pump water out of the hold.

The Deep Sea rose slowly as the pumps emptied it. By late afternoon the vessel’s own buoyancy supported almost all of its weight. Crews continued to seek and repair any openings in the hull.

The operation to raise the vessel involved about 80 people, including crews on the water from Global Diving and NRC-ES, and those who supported the operation on shore from local, state and federal agencies.

In addition to crane barge crews, divers and environmental response contractors, the effort included five volunteer teams from Island County’s Washington State University Beach Watchers Program who assisted Coast Guard personnel.Members of the Whidbey Island Audubon Society helped in shoreline assessment.

Removing spilled oil

Responders were prepared for a major release of oil because divers had been unable to determine whether two of the vessel’s six 5,500-gallon tanks contained fuel. In the first days after the sinking, divers and environmental cleanup crews hired by the Coast Guard removed more than 5,000 gallons of oil, mostly diesel fuel, from the vessel or surface waters above and around it.

The righting and lifting of the Deep Sea did dislodge smaller pockets of oil, which rose to the surface to form a light coating of oil on the water surface. Tidal currents pulled some sheen under and past 5,700 feet of floating oil-spill containment boom placed around the Deep Sea and vessels involved in the lifting. Light sheen reached shore in some places, but beach assessment teams found that this had evaporated, leaving no oil residue.A KCSO helicopter and crew helped environmental experts pinpoint patches of oil, and assess overall environmental conditions.

The response and preparations also included two NRC-ES oil-skimming vessels and two Ecology boats to aid environmental assessment.

Penn Cove Status

The state Health Department closed all shellfish harvesting in Penn Cove on May 15. The closure will remain in effect until testing confirms shellfish from the area are safe to eat.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard's Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.

Media Contacts:
Larry Altose, Ecology, 206-920-2600, larry.altose@ecy.wa.gov

Curt Hart, Ecology, 360-480-7908, curt.hart@ecy.wa.gov

Lt. j.g. Lindsay Cook, U.S. Coast Guard, 206-510-8031

Toni Droscher, Dept. of Natural Resources, 360-902-1523, toni.droscher@dnr.wa.gov

Terry Clark, Island County Department of Emergency Management, 360-632-3902

For more information:


Deep Sea lift update #5: Floating higher as water pumped out

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information

The Deep Sea is riding higher on the water as two pumps discharge 800-1,000 gallons of water each per minute. Two floating cranes righted and lifted the former fishing vessel from the bottom of Penn Cove on Sunday, June 3, 2012.

The Deep Sea rested with a 45-degree list to the left in 60 feet of water when the cranes started pulling at about 9:30 a.m. After righting the vessel to about 5 degrees, the crane lift paused with the deck still 15-20 feet below the surface. Divers removed tons of silt that covered the deck. The entire deck cleared the surface about 1:30. Pumping began soon after.

If the Deep Sea proves safe and stable enough, a tugboat will tow the vessel for dismantling at a Seattle shipyard. If the Deep Sea cannot be towed it will be placed on a barge. Either way, the trip to Seattle is expected on Monday, June 4.

Deep Sea lift update #4: Deep Sea has surfaced

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information

 The Deep Sea reached the surface of Penn Cove at about 1:30 p.m. The vessel remains supported by two floating cranes.

Crews will pump water out of the hull. Next: inspections to determine whether the vessel can safely float for a tow to a shipyard for dismantling. 

(Photo source: Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. )

Deep Sea lift update #3: Bow and wheelhouse break surface

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information

The bow and part of the wheelhouse on the Deep Sea can now been seen above the surface of Penn Cove.

The lift resumed after divers pushed tons of silt of the Deep Sea’s deck and checked the rigging that suspends the sunken fishing vessel off the bottom of Penn Cove. The next planned stop in the lifting process will occur when the deck clears the surface.

Workers will use two large pumps to remove water from the vessel. As it lightens, the Deep Sea will rise slowly. The two cranes lifting the vessel will continue to support it during this part of the process.

Deep Sea lift update #2: Deep Sea off the bottom

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information

The Deep Sea is clear of the bottom of Penn Cove, as two crane barges slowly and delicately bring the sunken fishing boat toward the surface of Penn Cove. The lift has paused so that divers can clear silt that covers the deck.

The larger crane – holding the back and center of the vessel – is sustaining a load of 260 tons. The smaller crane has 70 tons of load, as it holds the front end.

The ship now lists only five degrees to its left side. Some masts at the front of the vessel are visible above the surface.

When the deck is at the surface, crews will begin to pump water out of the vessel to prepare for further lifting.

Deep Sea lift update #1: Deep Sea being set upright, lift to follow

by Larry Altose, Ecology public information

Divers and crane operators – working under contract for the Department of Ecology – have rigged the Deep Sea for righting and lifting it from the bottom of Penn Cove, near Coupeville on Whidbey Island.

Crews have verified that all connections are secure, and both cranes have taken up load. Winches on the larger of the crane barges have begun to pull on connections to place the vessel upright from its position 45 degrees to the left.

Saturday, June 2, 2012

Work continues to lift vessel in Penn Cove on Sunday June 3


By Curt Hart, Communications Manager, Spills Program

Work continued Saturday June 2 to raise the 140-foot fishing vessel Deep Sea from Penn Cove, near Coupeville on Whidbey Island. Operations to lift the vessel will commence Sunday June 3.

Early tomorrow morning, the 300-foot crane barge D.B. General will join the 140-foot crane barge Oakland already in Penn Cove. The two cranes, owned by General Construction Co., will work in tandem to raise the Deep Sea.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the U.S. Coast Guard (Coast Guard), Washington departments of Ecology (Ecology) and Natural Resources (DNR), Island County Department of Emergency Management. Assisting are Global Diving & Salvage Inc. (Global) and NRC-Environmental Services (NRC-ES).

While more than 5,000 gallons of mixed oil products have been removed or recovered since the Deep Sea sank May 13 after a fire, an unknown quantity remains trapped on the vessel.

On Saturday, state and federal responders continued to observe oil floating out through small openings in the sunken vessel. These patches are thin and unrecoverable. Most of the oil is trapped within containment boom directly above the Deep Sea. NRC-Environmental Services crews have been using absorbent materials and skimming vessels to remove the oil.

Since lifting the vessel may cause more oil to leak on Sunday, unified command will have an array of protection measures and response equipment in place including:
  • Two oil-skimming vessels and other on-water skimming equipment.
  • A King County Sheriff’s Office helicopter to conduct aerial observation and direct skimming operations.
  • 4,200 feet of oil containment and deflection boom – including protecting area shellfish resources and
  • other environmentally sensitive areas in Penn Cove.
  • 3,000 feet of absorbent boom to collect oil floating on the surface.
  • Two vacuum trucks and two tug boats.
  • Nearly a dozen work vessels from all the public agencies collaborating on the response as well as private contractors.
On Saturday June 2, about 50 local, state and federal responders and private contractors were working on removal operations – on Sunday, the number will climb to about 80 people.

During the lifting operation, volunteers from Island County’s Washington State University Beachwatchers Program will be accompanied by Coast Guard personnel and stationed along the Penn Cove shoreline to spot and report any potential oil reaching the shore. Five teams will each consist of two to three trained volunteers plus a Coast Guard representative. The teams will also notify the U.S. Coast Guard if any of the protective booming breaks loose.

The Washington State Department of Health closed all shellfish harvesting in Penn Cove on May 15. The closure will remain in effect until testing confirms shellfish from the area are safe to eat.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard's Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.

For more information:

Fishing Vessel Deep Sea Fire incident website: www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/incidents/FVdeepsea/index.html

Ecology Spills Program: www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/spills.html

Ecology social media: www.ecy.wa.gov/about/newmedia.html